Download Our New Isagenix 15-Month Skidmore Study Flyer

The results of the latest Isagenix study are finally in! You can download our now updated 15-Month Skidmore Study Flyer with some of the 15-month results.

The year-long collaboration with nutrition researcher Paul Arciero Ph.D., of Skidmore College was designed to test the long-term success using Isagenix for sustained weight loss, and its effect on detoxification, and metabolism. The results showed extraordinary advantages to following the Isagenix system over a traditional heart-healthy diet.

The study consisted of 40 obese or overweight participants who followed an Isagenix system for initial weight loss. After 10 weeks the subjects were divided into two groups. To test the long-term effects of the products, one group then continued with an Isagenix maintenance system and the other group followed a heart-healthy diet for the remainder of the 15 months.

At the 2015 New Year Kick Off event in Palm Springs, Calif., Isagenix Chief Science Officer, Suk Cho Ph.D., shared his excitement over the long-term results of the Skidmore College study showing that subjects who stayed on the Isagenix maintenance plan were more successful with sustaining their weight loss. After one year, participants who continued with the Isagenix maintenance plan were able to maintain, if not increase overall weight loss, lean body mass, and continue to decrease their percent body and visceral fat. In comparison, those who followed the heart-healthy diet with the help of a dietitian on average found that they gained back most of their weight initially lost, along with a majority of the body fat.

Dr. Arciero plans to submit the research for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. In the meantime, feel free to share these exciting results and the new tool that meets legal compliance, now made available to all to view and download.


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Save Your Telomeres


Since their discovery more than 75 years ago by the Nobel Laureate geneticist Hermann Müller, telomeres have attracted worldwide attention among scientists investigating the aging process.

Telomeres are the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes composed of short DNA sequences protecting our DNA and genetic material from damage. Another Nobel Laureate, Elizabeth Blackburn, likened telomeres to the little plastic caps on the ends of shoelaces (aglets).

Under normal conditions, when a cell divides, telomeres shorten. If they grow too short, they reach what’s known as the Hayflick limit (named after the esteemed gerontologist Leonard Hayflick), and the protective capacity of the telomere decreases. Real-world relevance of telomere shortening can be observed during the aging process in humans when comparing the length of telomeres from newborns (8,000 base pairs) to adults (3,000 base pairs) to elderly individuals (1,500 base pairs).

Therefore, because several disease states and pathological processes have been linked to telomere shortening, several academic laboratories and companies have explored intervention strategies to slow down the rate of telomere attrition.

Several lifestyle factors can also significantly affect telomere health and the rate of telomere shortening. Among the most studied factors associated with shorter telomeres are psychosocial: depression, anxiety, and childhood adversity (1,2). Other lifestyle factors associated with telomere length include smoking, physical activity, drugs and toxins, and oxidative stress. Indeed, the decades of research implicating oxidative stress in the aging process has recently begun addressing and demonstrating a similarly deleterious role of oxidative stress on telomere length (3-5). As a result, antioxidant intake and subsequent plasma concentrations may be newly emerging biomarkers of telomere status (6-8).

Oxidative stress is defined as an overabundance of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive oxidative stress damages DNA, proteins, and lipids. While ROS are produced under normal conditions, oxidative stress occurs under conditions of poor health. To prevent oxidative stress, the body requires antioxidant nutrients such as glutathione precursors like the amino acid cysteine (found in IsaLean® Shakes) along with specific enzymes (9,10). Among these antioxidant enzymes is catalase, which functions to convert toxic and DNA-damaging hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water (11,12).

With this is mind, Isagenix partnered with scientists in the School of Nutrition and Health Promotion at Arizona State University to conduct a clinical evaluation in an independent, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study to evaluate Product B’s effect on catalase and other enzymes. Third-generation Product B contains a proprietary blend of plant botanicals, antioxidants, and other bioactives that provide significant protection against telomere shortening in cellular systems.

However, obtaining clinical support as a potential natural product against telomere shortening proved difficult due to analytical shortcomings and methodological issues in measuring telomere length. For this reason most studies considering the impact of dietary, environmental, or lifestyle factors on telomeres are frequently observed in studies with thousands of study participants.

In this study researchers had subjects consume either Product B or a placebo for 12 weeks and observed that subjects supplemented with Product B demonstrated a significant elevation of catalase in red blood cells (increase by 30 percent vs. placebo). Considering the role catalase may play in the aging process, this was very exciting news and the relevance of this finding was not lost on the researchers, who commented, “The increase in catalase observed by Product B is an exciting development considering the relationship between the enzyme and increased lifespan in animal studies.”

Now, Isagenix has developed fourth generation Product B® IsaGenesis®, which contains a novel lipid-soluble blend to increase absorption and bioavailability.

Clinical and experimental evidence is slowly emerging supporting the benefits of the nutritional antioxidants, plant botanicals, and other bioactives provided by Ageless Essentials™ Daily Pack, containing Product B IsaGenesis, IsaOmega Supreme®C-Lyte®Essentials for Men™ or Essentials for Women™, and Ageless Actives™.

In conjunction with a healthy diet, weight and stress management, quality and sufficient sleep, and regular exercise, Product B IsaGenesis may provide the most optimal protection against age-accelerated telomere shortening and a longer, healthier life.

References

  1. Puterman E et al. Determinants of telomere attrition over 1 year in healthy older women: stress and health behaviors matter. Mol Psychiatr 2014 Jul 29. doi: 10.1038/mp.2014.70. [Epub ahead of print].

  2. Shalev I et al. Stress and telomere biology: a lifespan perspective. Psychoneuroendocrinology 2013;38:1835-42.

  3. Correia-Melo C et al. Telomeres, oxidative stress and infl ammatory factors: partners in cellular senescence? Longev Healthspan 2014;3:1. doi: 10.1186/2046-2395-3-1.

  4. Demissie S et al. Insulin resistance, oxidative stress, hypertension, and leukocyte telomere length in men from the Framingham Heart Study. Aging Cell 2006;5:325-30.

  5. Salpea KD et al. Association of telomere length with type 2 diabetes, oxidative stress and UCP2 gene variation. Atherosclerosis 2010;209:42-50.

  6. Xu Q et al. Multivitamin use and telomere length in women. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;89:1857-63.

  7. Tiainen AM et al. Leukocyte telomere length and its relation to food and nutrient intake in an elderly population. Eur J Clin Nutr 2012;66:1290-4.

  8. Paul L. Diet, nutrition and telomere length. J Nutr Biochem 2011;22:895-901.

  9. Cutler RG. Oxidative stress and aging: catalase is a longevity determinant enzyme. Rejuvenation Res 2005;8:138-40.

  10. Schriner SE et al. Extension of murine life span by overexpression of catalase targeted to mitochondria. Science 2005;308:1909-11.

  11. Woo SR et al. Cells with dysfunctional telomeres are susceptible to reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide via generation of multichromosomal fusions and chromosomal fragments bearing telomeres. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2012;417:204-10.

  12. Linn S. DNA damage by iron and hydrogen peroxide in vitro and in vivo. Drug Metab Rev 1998;30:313-26.

IsaGenesis: 10 Plant-Based Ingredients to Help Maintain Your Youth

For those wishing to maintain their youthful energy and vitality, Isagenesis represents a cocktail of selected botanicals and nutrients that reinforce the body’s own defenses against oxidative stress and underlying free radicals that can accelerate the process of aging.

Telomeres, the protective DNA sequences at the end of each chromosome, are essential to maintain genome stability within cells. Telomere length is considered a hallmark of biological aging. Normal cell division leads to gradual shortening of protective telomeres over time and is a process associated with normal aging. Lifestyle factors such as poor diet, stress, and exposure to environmental toxins are also linked to premature telomere shortening as well as other negative consequences for health (1-5).

Years of scientific study have identified nutritional strategies that are associated with benefits for healthy aging. Consistent with this research, a growing body of scientific literature suggests that antioxidant-rich plant foods and botanical ingredients can help to support telomeres and defend against the harmful effects of oxidative stress known to accelerate the cellular aging process (6).

  1. Milk Thistle – Milk thistle contains compounds including silymarin with demonstrated liver-protective and antioxidant effects (6-8).

  2. Ashwagandha – This popular herb has been used for centuries in Ayurvedic medicine known for its antioxidant and neuroprotective effects (9, 10).

  3. Horny Goat Weed – There’s evidence indicating that horny goat weed has antioxidant properties. It also supports healthy aging through different mechanisms, including support for immune and endocrine systems and benefits for metabolism and organ function (11-16).

  4. Grape Seed Extract – Grape seed extract has a high concentration of polyphenolic flavonoids which have been shown to improve parameters related to heart health and platelet reactivity (17-21).

  5. Turmeric – The curry spice contains curcumin and other curcuminoids which have demonstrated neuroprotective and immunoenhancing effects. It has also been shown to stimulate antioxidant defenses in the body (22, 23).

  6. Giant knotweed (a source of resveratrol) – Giant knotweed, as a natural source of resveratrol (also found in red wine), provides potent antioxidant and immune system support and has been linked with benefits for healthy aging (24-26).

  7. Pomegranate – This fruit has significant antioxidant activity due to its high polyphenol content. It has been demonstrated to support heart, metabolism, and detoxification systems (27-29).

  8. White, Green, and Black Tea – Various types of tea leaves contain biologically active compounds associated with many health benefits, including support for cognitive function and blood flow (30-33).

  9. Asian Ginseng – Shown to help improve glucose metabolism and circulation as well as moderate the immune response through its antioxidant properties (34, 35).

  10. Bilberry – Shown to support cognitive function and memory and protect the brain from oxidative stress (36-41).

Additionally, the inclusion of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) and B12 (a mix of methylcobalamin and cyanocobalamin) helps combat oxidative stress. Vitamin C plays a role in developing and maintaining a healthy antioxidant status (42, 43). Adequate vitamin B12 status is essential to maintain normal blood homocysteine levels. Elevated blood homocysteine is a known risk factor for oxidative stress (44, 45).

IsaGenesis Clinical Trial

Catalase is a protective enzyme naturally produced by cells that is key to defending against cellular damage caused by harmful, free-radical generating peroxides. Catalase neutralizes these harmful compounds to prevent damage within cells. Supporting the body’s defense against oxidative stress helps maintain normal telomere function and mitigates many of the factors that contribute to premature telomere shortening (1-5).

In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, IsaGenesis significantly increased levels of catalase in healthy adults after 12 weeks of daily use (6). Forty-three healthy, nonsmoking men and women ages 25-45 participated in a clinical trial which was conducted at a major university. The participants were randomly assigned to receive four capsules per day of either IsaGenesis or a placebo.

The participants provided blood samples before starting the trial, at four weeks, and after 12 weeks. Overall, the researchers observed a 15 percent increase in catalase levels in those participants who supplemented with IsaGenesis, compared to participants who received a placebo.

The clinical trial demonstrates that IsaGenesis not only includes botanicals and antioxidant nutrients to support the body’s defense against oxidative stress, but their combination is also shown to stimulate the body’s own powerful antioxidant defenses.

References

  1. Bull CF et al. Telomere length in lymphocytes of older South Australian men may be inversely associated with plasma homocysteine. Rejuvenation Res 2009;12:341-9.

  2. Freitas-Simoes TM, Ros E, Sala-Vila A. Nutrients, foods, dietary patterns and telomere length: Update of epidemiological studies and randomized trials. Metabolism. 2016 Apr;65(4):406-15.

  3. Wolkowitz OM et al. Leukocyte Telomere Length in Major Depression: Correlations with Chronicity, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress-Preliminary Findings. PLoS One 2011; 6(3):e17837.

  4. Cassidy A et al. Associations between diet, lifestyle factors, and telomere length in women. Am J Clin Nutr 2010;91:1273-80.

  5. Demissie S et al. Insulin resistance, oxidative stress, hypertension, and leukocyte telomere length in men from the Framingham Heart Study. Aging Cell 2006; 5: 325-30.

  6. Sweazea KL, Johnston CS, Knurick J, Bliss CD. Plant-Based Nutraceutical Increases Plasma Catalase Activity in Healthy Participants: A Small Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Proof of Concept Trial. J Diet Suppl 2016;0,0:1-14.

  7. Velussi M et al. Long-term (12 months) treatment with an anti-oxidant drug (silymarin) is effective on hyperinsulinemia, exogenous insulin need and malondialdehyde levels in cirrhotic diabetic patients. J Hepatol 1997;26:871-9.

  8. Soto C et al. Silymarin increases antioxidant enzymes in alloxan-induced diabetes in rat pancreas. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. C Toxicol. Pharmacol 2003;136:205–212.

  9. Nelson SK et al. The induction of human superoxide dismutase and catalase in vivo: a fundamentally new approach to antioxidant therapy. Free Radic Biol Med 2006;40:341-7.

  10. Ahmad MK et al. Withania somnifera improves semen quality by regulating reproductive hormone levels and oxidative stress in seminal plasma of infertile males. Fertil Steril 2010;94:989-96.

  11. Cooley K et al. Naturopathic care for anxiety: a randomized controlled trial ISRCTN78958974. PLoS One2009;4:e6628.

  12. Wu et al. Effect of wolfberry fruit and Epimedium on DNA synthesis of the aging-youth 2BS fusion cells. Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Hie He Za Zhi 2003:23;926-928.

  13. Liu et al. Study on the changes of protein phosphorylation of p65 in lymphocytes of rats in progress of aging and interventional effect of Epimedium flavonoids. China Journal of Chinese Materia Medica 2008;33:73-76.

  14. Meng et al. Studies on the effect of active constituents of Herba Epimedii on hypothalamic monoamines neurotransmitter and other brain functions in aging rats. China Journal of Chinese Materia Medica 1996;21:683-685.

  15. Wang et al. Effect of Herba Epimedii and Fructus Lyciion mitochondrial DNA deletion, activity of respiratory chain enzyme complexes and ATP synthesis in aged rats. Journal of Peking University (Health Sci) 1996;21:683-685.

  16. Zeng et al. Studies on the antioxidant effect of constituents of Herba Epimedii. China Journal of Chinese Materia Medica 1997;22:46-47.

  17. Niu et al. Study on the savaging activity of Epimedii on hydroxyl radical. Chinese Journal of Sports Medicine;19:434-435.

  18. Vigna GB et al. Effect of a standardized grape seed extract on low-density lipoprotein susceptibility to oxidation in heavy smokers. Metabolism 2003; 52:1250-7.

  19. Kar P et al. Effects of grape seed extract in Type 2 diabetic subjects at high cardiovascular risk: a double blind randomized placebo controlled trial examining metabolic markers, vascular tone, inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin sensitivity. Diabet Med 2009;26:526-31.

  20. Barona J et al. Grape polyphenols reduce blood pressure and increase flow-mediated vasodilation in men with metabolic syndrome. J Nutr 2012;142:1626-32.

  21. Tome-Carneiro J et al. Consumption of a grape extract supplement containing resveratrol decreases oxidized LDL and ApoB in patients undergoing primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a triple-blind, 6-month follow-up, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Mol Nutr Food Res 2012;56:810-21.

  22. Weseler AR et al. Pleiotropic benefit of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols on vascular health–a randomized controlled clinical pilot study. PLos One 2011;6:328460.

  23. Nelson SK et al. The induction of human superoxide dismutase and catalase in vivo: a fundamentally new approach to antioxidant therapy. Free Radic Biol Med 2006;40:341-7.

  24. Pungcharoenkul K and Thongnopnua P. Effect of different curcuminoid supplement dosages on total in vivo antioxidant capacity and cholesterol levels of healthy human subjects. Phytother Res 2011;25:1721-6.

  25. Xia L et al. Resveratrol reduces endothelial progenitor cells senescence through augmentation of telomerase activity by Akt-dependent mechanisms. Br J Pharmacol 2008;155:387-94.

  26. Timmers S et al. Calorie restriction-like effects of 30 days of resveratrol supplementation on energy metabolism and metabolic profile in obese humans. Cell Metab 2011;14:612-22.

  27. Brasnyo P et al. Resveratrol improves insulin sensitivity, reduces oxidative stress and activates the Akt pathway in type 2 diabetic patients. Br J Nutr 2011;106:383-9.

  28. Rosenblat M et al. Anti-oxidative effects of pomegranate juice (PJ) consumption by diabetic patients on serum and on macrophages. Atherosclerosis 2006;187:363-71.

  29. Heber D et al. Safety and antioxidant activity of a pomegranate ellagitannin-enriched polyphenol dietary supplement in overweight individuals with increased waist size. J Agr Food Chem 2007;55:10050-4.

  30. Guo C et al. Pomegranate juice is potentially better than apple juice in improving antioxidant function in elderly subjects. Nutr Res 2008;28:72-7.

  31. Scholey A et al. Acute neurocognitive effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Appetite 2012;58:767-70.

  32. Wightman EL et al. Epigallocatechin gallate, cerebral blood flow parameters, cognitive performance and mood in healthy humans: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover investigation. Hum Psychopharmacol 2012;27:177-86

  33. Kuriyama S et al. Green tea consumption and cognitive function: a cross-sectional study from the Tsurugaya Project 1. Am J Clin Nutr 2006;83:355-61.

  34. Mandel SA et al. Molecular mechanisms of the neuroprotective/neurorescue action of multi-target green tea polyphenols. Front Biosci 2012;4:581-98.

  35. Ramesh T, Kim SW, Hwang SY, Sohn SH, Yoo SK, Kim SK. Panax ginseng reduces oxidative stress and restores antioxidant capacity in aged rats. Nutr Res 2012;32:718-26.

  36. Shergis JL, Zhang AL, Zhou W, Xue CC. Panax ginseng in Randomised Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review. Phytother Res 2012.

  37. Krikorian R, Shidler MD, Nash TA et al. Blueberry supplementation improves memory in older adults. J Agric Food Chem 2010;58:3996-4000.

  38. Joseph JA, Shukitt-Hale B, Willis LM. Grape juice, berries, and walnuts affect brain aging and behavior. J Nutr2009;139:1813S-7S.

  39. Williams CM, El Mohsen MA, Vauzour D et al. Blueberry-induced changes in spatial working memory correlate with changes in hippocampal CREB phosphorylation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. Free Radic Biol Med 2008;45:295-305.

  40. Legault J, Girard-Lalancette K, Grenon C, Dussault C, Pichette A. Antioxidant activity, inhibition of nitric oxide overproduction, and in vitro antiproliferative effect of maple sap and syrup from Acer saccharum. J Med Food2010;13:460-8.

  41. Brewer GJ, Torricelli JR, Lindsey AL et al. Age-related toxicity of amyloid-beta associated with increased pERK and pCREB in primary hippocampal neurons: reversal by blueberry extract. J Nutr Biochem 2009.

  42. Dulebohn RV, Yi W, Srivastava A, Akoh CC, Krewer G, Fischer JG. Effects of blueberry (Vaccinium ashei) on DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and phase II enzyme activities in rats. J Agric Food Chem 2008;56:11700-6.

  43. Groff and Gropper. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism. 5th Ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Learning. 2000.

  44. Shils et al. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 10th Ed. 2009.

  45. Fenech M et al. Folate, vitamin B12, homocysteine status and DNA damage in young Australian adults. Carcinogenesis 1998;19:1163-71.